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Like everyone else I have dislikes and many of them are considered delicacies in various countries. So let’s play a game: what are your favorite exotic foods that you think your friends would balk at touching?

Sterling Roszel on April 30th, 2012 @ 01:29 PM No comments

I grew up within the international community in Indonesia. I went to an international school, my parents socialized with friends living in Jakarta from all corners of the globe; life was good fun. What brings people together if not for good company, a good time, drinks and great food, right? I remember the potlucks my family would host at our house; all the people that would come over and the incredible food they would bring. From a very young age I developed a taste for pretty much any and every type of food – within reason, that is. Like everyone else I have dislikes and many of them are considered delicacies in various countries. So let’s play a game: what are your favorite exotic foods that you think your friends would balk at touching?

In both the Amazon jungle and Cambodia, tarantulas are considered a delicacy. The tribes in the Amazon will dig a pit in the ground, start a fire then wrap the tarantulas in leaves and barbeque them over the fire pit. In Cambodia, they deep-fry the tarantulas and eat them like potato chips. Apparently the only part to avoid ingesting is the fangs – they make good fishing hooks. The female tarantula eggs are also considered a plus and make for a tastier chomp.

Now let’s travel to Thailand where bugs of every kind are considered deee-lish. I’ve had first hand experience with this; walking through open air markets, passing vendors that call you over to their tents to try a sampling of grasshoppers on sticks, caterpillars, and flying ants, to name a few. My dad was the brave one, sampling fresh grubs that live within coconut trees – you could hear them pop in his mouth and he commented on how coconutty the pasty insides tasted.

Now we’ll hop over to the Philippines where locals go out and dig out whole cockroach nests by the sea shores and after netting the swarming nest, go home and fry up the whole nest and feast.

In parts of Africa, many tribes collect cow dung, leave them out in the sun to dry and then make cow-dung soup. It’s white in color and looks like a batch of Elmer’s glue. Not in a million years would I have thought up to make soup out of cow dung. But hey, that’s because I’m just not that creative.

Heading north we land in Iceland where the local delicacy is putrefied shark meat. The meat is dug into the ground to decompose for six months in order to get rid of the acid in the flesh. As you may well imagine, the smell is absolutely horrible. I have a friend that can attest that the taste isn’t an improvement over the smell.

The list goes on and on… here in the United States many Americans enjoy rocky mountain oysters. What exactly are those? Well, I’ll let you read about that online for yourselves.

I hope I’ve left you guys with a unique insight to the foods we human beings eat and consider to be delicacies. I’m sure I’ve left out quite a few so I welcome responses to this blog to help us have more…well, let’s just say ‘food for thought.’

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